Lazy Lady Living 2013 Permaculture Design Certification Class

Lazy Lady Living Permaculture Design Course

Krista Joy Arias, owner of Tierra Soul and teacher of the MamaMuse (un)Midwifery Mentorship program, has chosen a select few to be Village Builders and help spread the word about her new class, the 2013 Lazy Lady (and Lad) Living Permaculture Design Certification Program. I was one of the selected Village Builders and am posting here because I think some of my readers and followers may be interested. I took the last class and it’s wonderful! Lots of wonderful information and Krista and her husband are great people.

Come join the Lazy Lady Living community and be a part of something different. This course is about sustainable sustainability, and getting the most bang for your lazy buck. Interested in Permaculture, Traditional Nutrition, and Urban Farming? This is the class for you! It’s an 8-week 100% virtual course with the option to complete extra work (additional assignments and a Permaculture Design project) to receive a Permaculture Design Certificate.

The 16 Topics in Lazy-Lady Living:
1. Permaculture Philosophy & Ethics
2. Weston A. Price & Nutrient Density, Value added farming
3. Anthroposophy & Biodynamic Agriculture
4. Trauma, Initiation & Myth Mending
5. Patterns & Design Elements
6. Cultivated Ecology & Wildlife
7. Urban Ambrosia, Backyard Milk, Meat, Eggs and Honey
8. Urban Apothecary, Lazy-lady soap, salve, tincture and tonic
9. Sacred Slaughter & the Vegetarian Myth
10. Soil & Trees
11. Water & Aquaculture, ponds, dams & bridges, Water catchment, Grey water & composting toilets
12. Recycling, waste streams & DIY pitfalls, Diverse climate solutions
13. Earth Rhythms & Seasonal Celebrations, Advanced Simplicity
14. Undisturbed Birth & Home-Funerals, Sacred Union & Family Harmony
15. Ethical Business & Investing, Licensure vs. Free Marketplace, Personal Abundance & Giving Back
16. Energy, Climate & Catastrophe

Enrollment begins on May 15th and runs for 2 weeks only closing on May 31st. As a Village Builder, I get a commission for every person whom I get to enroll in the class.

**What will my commissions be going towards? My self-sustainability fund to get off-grid and have a place for people to come and do “farm stays”, learn about sustainability and permaculture, and also as a place for women and mothers to come experience with-women care and support throughout the childbearing cycles. I am also wanting to have a birthing hut built on the property for families to come have their children if they like, and also a Moon Lodge.

For those who sign up through me I will be helping and mentoring as I can if any questions or needs arise during the class and will be here as a collaboration partner. Follow the link below to sign up with your e-mail to receive information as Krista sends it out. She will also be making some videos that will be sent out to everyone on the mailing list as well between now and the start of class.

The cost of the course is $897 and there is a payment plan of $350/month for 3 months. Krista is also offering scholarships and the application will be announced on the 15th(ish) as well.

Here is my affiliate link so that I get the commission when you sign up, but remember enrollment doesn’t start until May 15! Be sure to sign up soon so that you don’t miss any information::

http://www.lazyladyliving.com/NaturoMomma/1

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Of Souls & Food

My body starves. My mind is chaotic, my heart is weak. My soul is heavy, malnourished.

So eat!

Eat of that which will nourish your body and your soul, for they are one and the same. They are interconnected and interwoven within each the other. Your soul chose your body as its house in this lifetime. And as such, it creates a temple. Your body becomes a place of worship, a place of honor. It is a place to honor itself as a holy place, and to honor that which is housed within it.

My soul breathes through every pore, and integrates every cell. And so I must eat that which serves the dual purpose of vitalizing my body and my soul.

Light the sacred butter upon the altar. Stare into the flames, and lose yourself in the shadows cast upon the stone walls. Pour the sacred honey upon your brow, the sacred milk upon your breast. Shake the sacred wheat across your loins and dust the flour upon your thighs. Let the calf’s blood trickle in rivulets along your skin, mingling all together. Take the rendered tallow mixed with pigments from the earth, take the henna paste, and mark upon your flesh those symbols of our past, of our lives, of the gods and of ourselves.

Kneel before the altar that is your self. Kneel before the altar that is your lover. Worship there. Bring offerings and give them unto the gods there, unto the soul. Feed and be fed. Drink and share libations. Dance and sing, cry and scream as beasts in heat or in the throes of labor. Nourish and be nourished.

(C) 2013 to Butter on the Altar

Kefir Attempt #1 and #2

So I was informed that Kefir is one of the more simple cultures to work with. However I am finding it to be quite difficult. I was gifted a tiny jar of barely a tablespoon’s worth of kefir grains and set about making my first batch. I think I put it in the fridge too soon (to stop the culturing process). I was afrad of not being able to catch it at the right time. Now that I’ve tasted (plain) kefir from the store I think I may have been close (the taste was coming on but was not yet the right consistency– still too much like milk and not enough like yogurt). A couple days alter I strained out the kefir grains and tried again, this time waiting a bit longer. Again the taste seemd to be coming on, but not the right consistency and the milk was separating on the counter. Then my room mate cleaned kitchen and put the jar in the cupboard, where I forgot about it. So now I need to get another batch of grains and try it again. Has anyone else had luck culturing kefir at home, with raw milk? Ay tips or advice or resources?

Raw Milk and Cultured Milk Products

What is raw milk? Raw milk is milk straight from the animal (cow, goat, sheep, camel…) that has not been pasteurized or homogenized. Raw milk retains all of it’s beneficial bacteria (which naturally keeps bad bacteria in check), all of its original proteins/carbs/fat/vitamins/minerals that are damaged, diminished, or completely destroyed through pasteurization. Raw milk can then in turn be soured, cultured, etc. Raw milk before refrigeration was usually turned into some sort of other dairy product, such as cheese or butter, to store it. Most people who cannot drink cow’s milk often find that they can eat raw milk/raw milk products with no issue (this is because raw milk retains the enzymes that the body needs to break down milk sugars. These enzymes are destroyed in pasteurization).

My raw milk journey began with a research paper I did for college a year or two ago on the benefits of raw milk and the current legislative restrictions regarding its sale. I skimmed the RealMilk website and that was about it. I had no idea where to get raw milk or how. Until last year, I had mostly put it to the back of my mind. Then I heard through the grapevine of a place to get goat’s milk. I grew up on raw goat’s milk that I had helped milk myself (my aunt raised Saanan goats) so I gave it a try. It was a hassle to try and get a hold of, and kind of expensive ($6 a quart I believe). I got it twice and it was alright, not sure what breed it came from. After that I put it on the back burner again until I started my Folklore Foods class. It re-kindled my interest and my search for raw cow’s milk, which finally bore fruit.

1. Drinking raw milk.
– Raw milk is definitely different than milk you get from the store. For one, it changes flavors. It changes throughout the year, and depends on the breed of cow and their diet. It has a much stronger flavor, which can sometimes taste “off” because of something that was eaten or when the frost kills the grass and it tries to grow back the chemical makeup of the grass is slightly different and is reflected in the milk. It doesn’t mean it has gone bad, however.

2. Other than drinking it, what do you do with it?
– Culture it (i.e. kefir, sour cream, buttermilk, etc.)
– Turn it into yogurt, butter/cultured butter, buttermilk, curds and whey, cheese, etc.

* After just trying it straight, I attempted to make curds and whey. The curds are essentially cream cheese, and the whey is what you use to make fermented foods (another traditional food prep method we’ll go over in the future). Whey is also a bi-product of cheese making and from yogurt (ever open a package of yogurt and see a yellow-ish liquid floating separate from your yogurt? That’s whey). When trying to clabber milk/get curds and whey, the warmer it is the faster it separates. The Nourishing Traditions book says to leave out on the counter in a covered jar for 12-48 hours, I had to leave mine out for almost 5 days before it really separated. If you want clabber (Lazy Lady Yogurt) leave it out till just before it actually separates. I also noticed with mine that the cream would separate to the top, then the bottom would be all together, but when you pour it through a cloth-lined seive to get the whey out of the curds it is actually separated.

* The curds were very strong in flavor, and have an interesting texture (more grainy than creamcheese) and I usually eat it on toast with honey. The whey is a soft yellow color and can be used for all kinds of things. The first thing I used it in was as a soak for oats. This helps to make the oats easier to digest and breaks down antinutrients (an example is gluten, or phitates) that are found in grains, some seeds and nuts, and legumes. I take a cup of steel cut rolled oats or regular oats and a cup of warm water+2 Tbsp whey and set it in a bowl over night, covered loosely. In the morning I add another cup of water and cook it for 5-10 minutes on the stove, then add maple syrup, cinnamon and sometimes pieces of fruit and raw milk.

* Oh, almost forgot! My favorite way to drink raw milk: set it to simmer on the stove, add dried dates. Simmer for 5-10 minutes, or longer. Mash dates to release flavor, pour through seive and drink warm. I also tried it once with some Oregon Chai. Yum! A thermometer would probably be useful here as well, since you don’t want to heat raw milk any higher than 110 degrees (for cooking, drinking, or yogurt making) because if you go higher than that you begin to pasteurize it killing all the beneficial enzymes and such.

* Yogurt: I didn’t have a thermometer, which I will be getting before I make yogurt again. I also don’t have a yogurt maker. I followed the yogurt recipe in Nourishing Traditions, using a few tabespoons of organic vanilla-flavored (I should have used Plain probably but it turned out fine) yogurt from the store as my “culture”. I cultured my yogurt in the oven, which was very hard to keep at 110 degrees, but it turned out and I got 2 pints of yogurt in the end which, regardless of the very potent flavor, was very good.

My Middle Eastern Dinner
Main dish: browned goat meat with herbs and rice (my first time ever having goat meat, it was local and amazing!).
Drink: raw milk simmered in dates with a dash of local raw honey.
Side dish: homemade raw milk yogurt with the dates from the milk added with a bit of local raw honey as well.